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Alex Henry

My work with the Rights Lab is based around the Antislavery Usable Past project. In particular I am looking into how images and photographs of the Holocaust have been used by museums and memorial sites around the world.

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Alison Gardner

Team Lead for the Rights Lab ‘Slavery-Free Communities’ initiative, working with statutory, business and voluntary-sector partners to develop policy and community-centred responses to modern slavery.

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Andrea Nicholson

Andrea Nicholson is a team lead with the Rights Lab, a university Beacon of Excellence, where she leads the project Survivors’ Solutions. Her research draws on history, cultures, literature and psychology to interpret the law and frameworks surrounding contemporary slavery, focusing on the value and application of survivors´ narratives to anti-slavery strategies.

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Bethany Jackson

My Rights Lab-funded research focuses on finding innovative ways to use geospatial technology to help combat the issue of contemporary slavery. I am a team member with the Slavery Observatory project.

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Caroline Emberson

Caroline joined the University of Nottingham in March 2017. She is working, with Dr Alexander Trautrims, on the Rights Lab ‘Unchained supply’ project which engages closely with practitioners to better understand, and to effect change in, modern slavery supply chain risk.

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Charlotte James

A research associate for the Rights Lab’s Antislavery Usable Project, exploring the use of visual culture in the modern abolition movement. My focus is on murals and I am creating a database of modern antislavery murals across a variety of topics from around the world.

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Disposable Brides

In 2017, the Global Estimates of Slavery included 15.4 million people in forced marriages. We are rigorously exploring the nature, extent, reality, and consequences of forced marriage, drawing up precise definitions of when ‘forced marriages’ should be seen as forms of slavery, gathering detailed information regarding forced marriage around the world, learning from survivors of forced marriage, and building concrete proposals for policy partners seeking to aid freedom from forced marriage as part of the global goal to end modern slavery by 2030.

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Efe Bella

"This how we sit when we are transported. This is how we sit in Libya; we don’t go out. In the truck. Always. In the Lampadusa [boat] this is how we sit for the whole journey. They are moving you from here to here, and this is how you have to sit, so many people together. In this position it is very bad. It is like being a slave. In the boat, if I had fallen in I would never had survived." This image was taken as part of the Voice of Freedom workshop in Asti, Italy, working with ten Nigerian women trafficked through Libya to Italy. The title of the photograph refers to the name of the individual who took the photograph, and not the figure therein.  Photo: Efe Bella, courtesy of Voice of Freedom.

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Emmanuel Joyce

"This is an iron that many people use to iron clothes. But there is another thing they use the iron for. Most of the madames that brought guests to Europe used the same iron to maltreat people, especially women that are trafficked—they use this iron on them when they get refused to pay their money. Even a friend of mine, she showed me her back where her madame plugged the iron and press it on her back. It is very bad for a woman to use an iron that is plugged, to put it on someone’s body, all in the name of money." This image was taken as part of the Voice of Freedom workshop in Asti, Italy, working with ten Nigerian women trafficked through Libya to Italy. The title of the photograph refers to the name of the individual who took the photograph, and not the figure therein.  Photo: Emmanuel Joyce, courtesy of Voice of Freedom.

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Errolinda Ward

A Research Associate with the Rights Lab's Slavery-Free Communities project. One of my aims is to develop collaborative research with the Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) and anti-slavery partnerships across the Midlands, building the evidence base for local and community-based anti-slavery interventions.

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Gloria

"Many of us, and almost all of us, have passed through too many temptations in life, too many struggles and trials—the trip here, how difficult it is. Libya is hell… the sun… we are in prison. But being out of that Libya is to testify that we are now free from that place. So I took this picture as a bond of consolation. We were trafficked, and the anti-traffickers giving us the hope that they are going to deal with these issues." This image was taken as part of the Voice of Freedom workshop in Asti, Italy, working with ten Nigerian women trafficked through Libya to Italy. The title of the photograph refers to the name of the individual who took the photograph, and not the figure therein.  Photo: Gloria, courtesy of Voice of Freedom.

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Greatness, self-portrait

"In desert there is no house. You can’t see house in desert. We just sleep outside. Back then they would load us like 50, 20, in the Helios [truck]. There would not be space for you to stand or move. So anybody that fall down, they are not going to wait for him, that person will just die there. Because of the sand there is no water, no food. We spent the nights on the sand, it was very very cold. Back home in Nigeria the sand is very good. There is no cold, no hot. Very good. We do spread clothes on it, and sleep on it. We don’t need to go inside because the sand will be okay." This image was taken as part of the Voice of Freedom workshop in Asti, Italy, working with ten Nigerian women trafficked through Libya to Italy.   Photo: self-portrait, Greatness, courtesy of Voice of Freedom. 

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Hannah Jeffery

“The Black Power movement represents a largely unchronicled epic in American history,” argues historian Peniel E. Joseph in his article “Rethinking the Black Power Era. This academic oversight catalysed a wave of Black Power studies in the 2000s, with scholars like Joseph and Paul Gardullo altering perceptions of the movement by expanding it from the parameters of the 1960s. This scholarship reconsiders the temporal, chronological and spatial frameworks that define the era, and my PhD will join this repertoire of Black Power scholarship by proposing the existence of a Long Black Power Movement.

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Hannah-Rose Murray

A research associate with the Rights Lab's Usable Past project, working on heritage and public history.

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Jessica Wardlaw

A Research Associate with the Rights Lab's Slavery Observatory project. My research interests span Geography (including Web GIS, cartography, spatial cognition and knowledge construction, health geography) and Human-Computer Interaction (from applied aspects such as user-centred design, usability engineering and design practice, to cognitive aspects including sense- and decision-making, information visualisation and affective interaction design), especially as it applies to geographical and so-called "Big" data. I am especially interested in the boundary between amateur and professional, and human and machine, capabilities.

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Juliana Semione

A research associate on the Slavery Free Communities project. I am passionate about facilitating and improving community partnerships so that those partnerships can improve care, services, and ultimately quality of life for survivors of modern slavery.

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Measuring Slavery

Only by measuring and understanding the scale of slavery can we effectively tackle it. We use Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE) and other methodologies to estimate slavery prevelance in the UK and around the world. We do this in combination with our use of mobile phone, population and behavioural data, in order to better monitor prorgress to achieving Sustainable Development Goal 8.7 (ending slavery by 2030).We also conduct in-depth analysis around key intersecting issues for example the relationship between slavery data and data on conflict, democracy, governance, and women's rights, so we can better understand the potential root causes of enslavement. You can read a recent report by our researcher, Professor Bernard Silverman, here: "The R package modslavmse for multiple systems analysis". This accompanies Bernard's R package of programs for MSE for modern slavery prevalence.

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Minh Dang

A Ph.D. Student in the School of Politics and International Relations studying the wellbeing of survivors of human trafficking and slavery. She is a member of the University of Nottingham’s Rights Lab, where she will launch the Survivor Alliance, a leadership capacity-building organization for survivors of slavery and human trafficking.

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Okungbowa Osamude

"That wall reminds me of those days when we were in Libya, of the prison I told you about, how we can’t escape. We have to see the brightness of the sun through a hole, and even money cannot pass through that hole. Nothing can pass through it. It’s under the gate and the men give us biscuits, just something that will sustain us for that day. It was not easy. I told you how I was trafficked, how I was being kidnapped. They were asked for ransom to pay back, a huge ransom. It was more than the money that we bring. The emotion of the building, the way that I took the picture, it shows that it’s a prison, it’s where people have been trapped. You’ll just be there, not going out. No food, nothing. So that’s what the building reminds me a lot about. It’s really important, it’s one of my favourites." This image was taken as part of the Voice of Freedom workshop in Asti, Italy, working with ten Nigerian women trafficked through Libya to Italy. The title of the photograph refers to the name of the individual who took the photograph, and not the figure therein.  Photo: Okungbowa Osamude, courtesy of Voice of Freedom.

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Omo Colis

"Back in Nigeria anytime I wanted to pluck mango, this is how I pluck it. I had a farm from when I was 13 years old. My grandmother gave me the land because no money, no one go to school. So they give me the land. I cleared the land, plant cassava, plant mango. I went there to harvest it, then I sell it and get some money so I will take care of my brother, pay for his school fees. That is why I hold this tree. Anytime I see this picture I will remember. The land was far. Maybe if I didn’t have anything to do at home I would go to the farm, clear it there, clean the farm. I use cassava to make fufu or fry gari. Then I do palm oil. So from there we sold them. After that there is not a lot of money... even the land, if I plant fruit nothing will go well. So someone came in order to help me, so that I can go to school and a lot of things. From there they took me, this person, I didn’t even know that he want to sell me at Libya. Then he sell me from there, then another person sell me." This image was taken as part of the Voice of Freedom workshop in Asti, Italy, working with ten Nigerian women trafficked through Libya to Italy. The title of the photograph refers to the name of the individual who took the photograph, and not the figure therein.  Photo: Omo Colis, courtesy of Voice of Freedom.