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The Child Rights Lens

Addressing slavery as a crucial social challenge faced by children, we are completing a comprehensive application of a child rights lens to contemporary slavery and antislavery. We are mapping existing antislavery practice in child rights, and outlining the key elements of a child rights-based lens for ending slavery. By understanding what child rights mean for the conceptualisation of slavery, we can propose how the operationalisation of different child rights standards can affect the practice of scholars and advocates working on slavery. We aim to understand the benefits and potential shortcomings of a child rights approach to antislavery work.

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The Economic Dividend

Rather than having to end poverty to end slavery, can we end slavery to help end poverty? We are completing the first extended analysis of contemporary slavery’s political economy.  While there are studies analysing labour markets, systematic studies on the economic incentives of contemporary slavery are missing. Our work includes an analysis of the economic incentives for using slave labour, and an analysis of factors that determine the vulnerability of a person. This enables deeper investigations of markets for different types of enslaved labour. We are also demontrating how slavery impacts the economy and development of a country, and measuring the dividend that comes with liberation. Here we statistically model and measure the economic benefits of ending slavery. We aim to show the theoretical benefits of eradicating modern slavery on the wider economy, and provide a solid scientific basis for encouraging countries to prioritise antislavery efforts.

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Naomi Lott

Naomi's research focuses on the child's right to play and its implementation and incorporation within the national context.

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Professor Aoife Nolan

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Timo Schrader

My thesis offers the first in-depth urban cultural analysis of the network of Puerto Rican community activism in Loisaida (part of the Lower East Side) from the 1960s to the 1990s. This community organized itself to fight against postwar urban deindustrialization, housing disinvestment, and gentrification, which negatively affected low-income areas. By recreating the urban history of sustainable activism in Loisaida and focusing on the initiatives and projects of key community organizations, I demonstrate how they sought ultimately to claim specific spaces: from housing and public spaces to educational and cultural centers. The adjective 'sustainable' does not simply connote 'environmental' but rather highlights the role of the environment in a broader sense-built environment, educational environment, cultural environment-in shaping the quality of life of an urban neighborhood. Moreover, the methodologies and rhetoric of these groups frame their activism in distinctly human rights rhetoric: the right to education, the right to housing, the right to the city.